Let’s Take a Brief Look Back to IEEE VIS 2017

Let’s Take a Brief Look Back to IEEE VIS 2017

Every year in autumn, researchers and practitioners from academia, government, and industry come together at IEEE VIS to explore their shared interests in tools, techniques, and technology. Among them, there was also a group of visual computing researchers from the Universities of Stuttgart and Konstanz. They visited this scientific meeting to present their newest insights and developments in the field of Visual Computing. In this blog post you find a list of the their publications presented to the international community.

PhD Students Met in Austria

PhD Students Met in Austria

Together with the Human-Computer-Interaction Group of the University of Stuttgart, the SFB-TRR 161 organized a Winter School in February at Söllerhaus (Kleinwalsertal, Austria). During this three days seminar several visual computing scientists from the University of Stuttgart and the University of Konstanz could intensify their scientific cooperation, exchange their knowledge and talk about their new findings in their projects work. All of the PhD students gave talks and did some demonstrations.

How to Analyze Huge Amount of Eye Tracking Data?

How to Analyze Huge Amount of Eye Tracking Data?

Kuno Kurzhals is a visualization scientist at the Visualization Research Center of the University of Stuttgart (VISUS) with special focus on video visualization and evaluation methods in combination with eye tracking. His research is associated with the SFB-TRR 161 where scientists whant to establish quantification as a key ingredient of visual computing research. In this video interview he talks about the challenges and aims of his activities and explains some of his visualization results.

Eye Tracking in the Context of Image Quality Assessment

Eye Tracking in the Context of Image Quality Assessment

Franz Hahn is a PhD student in the Multimedia Signal Processing Group of Prof. Dietmar Saupe at the University of Konstanz. During his project activities in the SFB-TRR 161 he is concerned with the topic of image and video quality assessment. Using Eye Tracking he aims to develop a predictive model that improves the quality of images by keeping the data size the same.

Interview with a Visual Computing Scientist

Interview with a Visual Computing Scientist

“What we aim for in the end is some sort of mechanism, that tells us, whether the users understood, what they were looking at.”

Jakob Karolus is a researcher at the Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems at the University of Stuttgart working in the field of Human-Computer Interaction. Within the project SFB-TRR 161 “Quantitative Methods for Visual Computing” he wants to find out how different visualizations influence the eyemovement patterns of people.

1st Summer School for Visual Computing in Stuttgart

1<sup>st</sup> Summer School for Visual Computing in Stuttgart

Quantifying User-centered Experiences (QUE-2016)” was the title of the the 1st Summer School for Visual Computing at the University of Stuttgart (Germany), organized by the SFB-TRR 161. From 2nd to 6th of July, about 40 PhD students from America, Hungary and Germany met at the Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems (VIS) and the Visualization Research Center (VISUS) to learn about visual computing and discuss current questions, trends and activities in data analysis, human-computer interaction, visualization or eye tracking. During these five days the young academics could talk about their current research activities, and exchange their know-how and their experience in the academic world.

The Surface of Baden-Württemberg at Very High Resolution

The Surface of Baden-Württemberg at Very High Resolution

How did the formation of our landscape develop? Where did existing dolines and terraces arise? And why are there special valley configurations, meander or further landscape shapes, for example dunes directly in Baden-Württemberg? These are only some of the questions geology scientists like Prof. Hartmut Seyfried and his research assistant Elena Beckenbach (Institute of Planetology, University of Stuttgart) try to answer in their research work. Recently they presented their newest results based on a new visualization of the landscape of Baden-Württemberg to members of the Office for Geo-Information and Land Development (LGL) at the Powerwall of the Visualization Research Center of the University of Stuttgart (VISUS).

Making group structures visible

Making group structures visible

Whenever we want to change things and strive for new visions, we have to understand an existing system in the first place. For that purpose scientists are working on extensive tests and studies, they take measurements and collect statistical data. The more understandable and evident their data collections are, the easier they will gain new findings and subsequently explain their results and ideas to others. With increasing complexity of the data and considering that properties and parameters may change over time, it becomes difficult to analyze the data manually. Visual computing scientists work on new applications and new methods for a better handling of this data using software systems.