Dative Subjects: Historical Change Visualized

Dative Subjects: Historical Change Visualized

Linguistic data is inherently multidimensional, with complex interactions between
different linguistic features and structures being the norm rather than the
exception. Historical linguistic change typically is the result of such complex interactions.
The core remit of historical linguistic work is to identify a language change
and to understand how different relevant factors have interacted with each other
across time to effectuate the change.

Quantifying Visual Abstraction Quality

Quantifying Visual Abstraction Quality

Computer graphics is mostly associated with the creation of artificial images that resemble real photographs as close as possible. However, realistic representations usually contain more information than necessary to transmit intended information. Abstract images can be used to convey information more effectively. The field of non-photorealistic rendering focuses on the automatic creation of these expressive illustrations, often inspired by the work of real artists.

Working with MagicLeap One Technology in New Zealand

Working with MagicLeap One Technology in New Zealand

Between the 11th until 15th of February I attended the Augmented Reality Summer School at the University of Auckland, in New Zealand. There, I had the opportunity to use the MagicLeap One, a sophisticated Optical See-Through Head-Mounted Display (OST-HMD) device. I enjoyed the trip and came back home very inspired to continue with my research activities.

How to Cue and Redirect our Attention by Warning Systems

How to Cue and Redirect our Attention by Warning Systems

When designing technical solutions, developers are aware that the attentional capacity of their users is limited. Thus, it is an open question on how our limited attention can be cued and redirected by warning systems. In a recent study, Lewis Chuang and Christiane Glatz tested different warning sounds at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tübingen. The scientists found out that certain sounds redirected our attention away from an ongoing task better than others.