Visualizing Uncertainty of Proteins at PacificVis 2018

Visualizing Uncertainty of Proteins at PacificVis 2018

We presented an approach for uncertainty visualization of proteins at the 11th IEEE Pacific Visualization Symposium in Kōbe, Japan. In some application areas such as medical visualization or weather forecasting, uncertainty is nowadays often illustrated to enable a more informed visual analysis. However, molecular visualization rarely incorporates uncertainty, although it is present in the data.

Physical Computing and Biosensing Hackathon in Lancaster

Physical Computing and Biosensing Hackathon in Lancaster

On Wednesday September 20th, Jakob Karolus and me ran a Physical Computing and Biosensing Hackathon within the context of the AffecTech training week in Lancaster. In this day-long event, 15 AffecTech Ph.D. students with backgrounds ranging from Clinical Psychology to Human-Computer Interaction worked in multidisciplinary groups to create systems that support people coping with emotional and affective conditions.

How can we Visualize Large Amounts of Performance Data with Conventional Infovis Techniques?

How can we Visualize Large Amounts of Performance Data with Conventional Infovis Techniques?

The SIGGRAPH Asia 2017 conference was held in Bangkok. It attracted many interested visitors from industry, education and other fields. The conference is mainly about rendering, graphics and animation. However, there is also a small Symposium on Visualization (SA17VIS) for researches from visualization and more graphics intensive backgrounds to meet and exchange ideas. During this symposium we had the change to present our paper “Visual Exploration of Mainframe Workloads”.

Research Results from Tübingen, Konstanz and Stuttgart accepted at CHI 2018

Research Results from Tübingen, Konstanz and Stuttgart accepted at CHI 2018

Each year in December, senior Human-Computer Interaction researchers meet to discuss the articles submitted to the Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (or in short CHI). CHI is the most important venue for research on Human-Computer Interaction and covers a broad range of research from understanding people, via novel interaction techniques to visualization. This year, over 300 researchers came to Montreal and discussed the articles submitted to CHI 2018. With Harald Reiterer and me, two associate chairs from Konstanz and Stuttgart participated in the meeting. CHI only accepts about 25% of the submissions after a rigorous peer review process. With 16 accepted publications, the groups participating in SFB-TRR 161 from Konstanz, Tübingen, and Stuttgart have been very successful and are happy about how well their submissions have been received.