In cooperation with the GI-Fachgruppe Be-Greifbare Interaktion, the HCI group at the University of Stuttgart organized the annual Inventors-workshop with the topic: Using Physiological Sensing for Embodied Interaction. In the workshop, we introduced the basic concepts for sensing of human muscle activity accompanied by a refreshing Keynote from Leonardo Gizzi. We provided a basic explanation of how physiological sensing works, introduced how it can be technically realized, and showed different applications and usage scenarios.

Opening of the Inventors workshop with Albrecht Schmidt (Photo: HciLab Stuttgart).

Using Arduino-boards with EMG shields all participants acquired hands-on experience in creating their own EMG controlled device. Additionally, we provided a processing module with Bluetooth that allowed building a wireless EMG-Prototype. During the workshop, we first used a pre-programmed setup to demonstrate working principle and the signal output that can be expected. Then teams defined their own ideas and worked towards a fully functional prototype. At the end of the workshop, each team presented what they have created.

Fokus of the hands-on session was to create EMG controlled devices using Arduino-boards with EMG shields like it is shown here (Photo: HciLab Stuttgart).

You can find the results of the workshop, including video presentations of each project, on https://www.hcilab.org/erfinderworkshop2017. Additionally, you can find software and hardware resources on https://www.hcilab.org/erfinderworkshop2017/hardware-and-software-for-emg.

Using Physiological Sensing for Embodied Interaction

Jakob Karolus is a PhD student at the Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems (VIS) at the University of Stuttgart, currently working on the SFB-TRR 161 project C02 (Physiologically Based Interaction and Adaptive Visualization). His research focuses on new methods and techniques for cognition-aware interaction based on physiological sensing.

One thought on “Using Physiological Sensing for Embodied Interaction

  • 2017-03-30 at 2:15 PM
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    Great work!!! It is so refreshing to see students craft something and to understand the conditions that influence the quality of data collection. I look forward to the day when I can play air guitar for real.

    Reply

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